Windows 7 opinion?

Windows specific questions.
TESLACOIL
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bobsobol

Postby TESLACOIL » Aug 10, 2010 0:19

@ bobsobol, ref AMiga/Mac yeah i gave up on computers after the home computer crash

the computer world went from fun, multicolor screens with sound back to (BBC , C64 etc) green and orange IBM clones VDU's without a soundcard

I gave that decade a miss... i got back into computing when the first Pentiums win95 with colour and sound started making waves in High street shops

Im not precious about any system.....horses for course i say

As Compatibility is my main priority APPLE & Linux have never been able to tempt me

If you got the dosh and don't mind wearing invisible handcuffs the Apple Universe is going to be your friend

If you have an independent or nerdy streak & like to get your hands dirty then open source like Linux is prolly the best way to go

I almost bought my first apple device last week....the touch screen Ipod...for some of my AI project's i think a stripped down version of Linux will give me the simplicity & reliability im after (hate windows bloat)

Linux now totally Dominates when it comes to Super Computer OS, AI and robotics are adjacent areas , I think open source has value when configuring unusual hardware configurations. I hope Linux spreads it wings to these additional niches

Each OS/system requires a fair level of commitment...so unless your hurting bad with your particular choice there little incentive to change

At least compatibility has improved across the board over the last few years, i guess it had to as casual new users don't have the computer skills to fix things for themselves. It will be another 20 years or so before the majority of general populous becomes computer literate. I find most peeps under 25 (UK) are what i call computer literate

Glad to hear that win7 is leaning back towards core functionality, I was a bit worried after i saw Vista that i would end up being forced to use a M$ os with a "Hyperbloatdoitourway" philosophy

Now Vista's not all bad, but having to have a relatively high end system is a big limiting factor. If you work in IT no doubt the hardware your using will be first or second wave....of the day. But the reality is that 70%+ computers in use today are yesterdays second wave
bobsobol
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Re: bobsobol

Postby bobsobol » Aug 10, 2010 5:09

TESLACOIL wrote:If you got the dosh and don't mind wearing invisible handcuffs the Apple Universe is going to be your friend
Now that Apple computers are intel based PCs that will run Windows and Linux, I see no particular invisible cuffs. At least, no more than if you find your-self relying on Microsoft technologies that are nearly but not quite standard, like .DOCX files or .Net framework or Microsoft SQL Server or Microsofts' old Java VM or Visual C++. Just different enough to make any application that it can run not quite work on anybody elses' version that if they comply to the industry agreed standards. (ODF, Sun Java VM, Mono etc)
TESLACOIL wrote:Each OS/system requires a fair level of commitment...so unless your hurting bad with your particular choice there little incentive to change
I've been using multi-boot menus since before Win95 on my PCs, just so I could run OS/2 or NT 4 alongside DOS. There never was any point in running Windows under DOS in my opinion. So there is no need to commit to one OS or the other. You can have them all! Especially since there are several competing freeware Virtual Machine options so you don't even have to reboot to switch from running iMovie to running Word 2010, to running Paradox to running KDE Office.
TESLACOIL wrote:It will be another 20 years or so before the majority of general populous becomes computer literate. I find most peeps under 25 (UK) are what i call computer literate
I'm nearly 40, and my father, and father-in-law are in their late 80s. I would consider both of them to have reasonable computer literacy. They both know what an OS is, what the different ones are, how to eMail and use internet banking, and eBay and do on-line poker. My father started programming on punch tape for the lathes he ran in his workshop when I was at school, and my step-father is a photography enthusiast, so Photoshop is his primary concern aside from the internet.

Yes... they both call me when they get infected or their PC is making a funny noise or they can't install something cos their eyes aren't up to reading those stupid long serial numbers. They work slow, and it's clear that "intuitive natural interfaces" designed by head UI boffins are anything but intuitive to them, but they know what they are doing.

They can both work their mobile phone better than I can mine. XD I hate those things.
TESLACOIL wrote:Glad to hear that win7 is leaning back towards core functionality, I was a bit worried after i saw Vista that i would end up being forced to use a M$ os with a "Hyperbloatdoitourway" philosophy
I'm not sure what that means. Win7 is a little more bloated than Vista... but the big bloat comes in both comes from the x64 / x86 split that MS solves with .Net framework 3 and the Windows Presentation Foundation. It's no worse a solution than Apples Fat Binaries or their newer "Universal Binary" applications... but it does require yet another JIT Virtual Machine to add to our JVM, and systems like Python and LUA are equally powerful, they just aren't patented by Microsoft. XD
TESLACOIL wrote:Now Vista's not all bad, but having to have a relatively high end system is a big limiting factor. If you work in IT no doubt the hardware your using will be first or second wave....of the day. But the reality is that 70%+ computers in use today are yesterdays second wave
Yes... That is why I still say, if you only have 1 core, and can't do x64 don't bother upgrading from XP. In fact, never upgrade a PC from XP to Vista or Se7en. Here's why... XP doesn't really support PCI-E, you need Direct X9 or 10 for that, and XP can't do it. Vista and Seven don't really support AGP or PCI graphics, because DWM and the WPF only really work as they should on a Direct X9 / 10 gfx system, and AGP and PCI can't support that. Add to which, the core system resources required by the energy saving technology employed in Vista, 7 and OS X 10.4+ all require at least 3 gig of memory to keep as much cached in it as possible to reduce Hard Disk spin and allow rapid individual component hibernation.

That all requires an SMP 2.2 system which is key to the FSB on the motherboard, and none of that is supported by XP... in fact, if you have any of that enabled you almost have to hack XP to get it to install on anything that will run Vista as it was intended.

So trying to run Vista, or Windows 7 on hardware designed to run XP is far worse than trying to run Snow Leopard on a system without one of Apples Unique identity code chips in it. XD And the inverse is true... if you don't like Vista or 7 don't downgrade to XP, it'll never support your hardware.

However, Linux and BSD will work on anything, just recompile it to the correct target, and it works. It won't ever support the same level of energy saving green points as the commercial systems, and it won't ever make enough money to place commercials for it on television either... But Ubuntu Linux, or PC-BSD are so easy to use, and have so many "free" applications which are supported so much better by the community on the web than the support you get from... say Corel or Quark or Adobe. There is no reason why people feeling the age of an XP machine and looking to replace either hardware or OS, and not wanting to go Vista or Seven or pay for Apple hardware should not switch to one of those OS.

The only reason they don't IMHO, is because they haven't seen it advertised on TV, and the CompUSA / Frys / PC Word guy isn't going to come up to them and say, "Have you tried an Ubuntu PC? We have those on offer over here." ;) There isn't anything "in it" for them to do so.
Theunis Jansen
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Postby Theunis Jansen » Aug 10, 2010 12:48

My daughter has a Hp with Vista pre-installed. Her comment:- She hasn't come across any virus protection program that can remove the biggest virus of them all - VISTA. Another said Vista is the worst of the worst and thanks goodness for WINDOWS 7. Another said Vista is food for bacteria. (I can't use his words).
My own PC doesn't have a dual/duo/64 bit CPU, so Windows 7 would be a waste for me.
LINUX kernel has for some time had QUAD CPU support and the support for a wide range of manufacturers' CPU's is still growing.

LINUX systems aren't necessarily free. You can buy Mandriva, UBUNTU, RED HAT and a couple of other LINUXes for just about nothing compared to the price of Microsoft products AND GET A COUPLE OF YEARS SUPPORT. ( Oops my daughter says it's shouting if u use caps, but it's only for emphasis).
If you download a free copy then u are on your own which is reasonable because why set up a large support centre for free, oh darn -- the large community support is free.

DOSBOX 0.74 runs the 16bit programs on Vista and Windows 7 and fiddling with the config file makes it viable for older programs only. U can even run a batch file to give u a menu and then run various programs from it. (It is like a VM for 16 bit progs)

If you write your own programs for your company's use you may as well go LINUX. I'm not pushing LINUX it's just I don't like the attitude of MS. Especially here in South Africa where it is a take it or leave it attitude and their technicians and sales/support staff don't know what's what.
I use Windows XP Pro SP2 and it suits my purposes. If this PC blows up I will consider LINUX as first choice because I'll buy a 64bit PC (actually just the Mboard, quad CPU and RAM). By the way the First National Bank (Just another name for BOB as their name used to be Barclays Overseas Bank incorporation the First National Bank of South Africa, has converted to LINUX so there must be something to it.

But all said and done if u upgrade your PC then VM (it's much cheaper than WINDOWS) is the way to go if you are rolling in cash because you have to have/buy every OS you want to run on it, (smart for developers) but then again u want to run what u have.
Hmm that was my farthings worth.
bobsobol
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Postby bobsobol » Aug 11, 2010 19:31

Theunis Jansen wrote:My daughter has a Hp with Vista pre-installed. Her comment:- She hasn't come across any virus protection program that can remove the biggest virus of them all - VISTA. Another said Vista is the worst of the worst and thanks goodness for WINDOWS 7. Another said Vista is food for bacteria. (I can't use his words).
And yet, I usually can't tell when I'm using Vista, or Seven. They are too similar in my eyes. XD
Theunis Jansen wrote:My own PC doesn't have a dual/duo/64 bit CPU, so Windows 7 would be a waste for me.
LINUX kernel has for some time had QUAD CPU support and the support for a wide range of manufacturers' CPU's is still growing.
And support for PowerPC and ARM and... blah blah blah. But actually, XP supports x64 and i64... it's just that in the XP x64 versions there is almost no backward compatibility with x86 programs. What does exist doesn't work very well.

And Windows NT4 had support for up to 6 / 9 CPUs. So there's nothing new in the "supports" department, only the "requires" department. If you go "Home Basic" there is no real additional requirements either, but the "Home Basic" versions don't have as many 'features' as XP Home... so that would be a "downgrade" IMHO.
Theunis Jansen wrote:LINUX systems aren't necessarily free. You can buy Mandriva, UBUNTU, RED HAT and a couple of other LINUXes for just about nothing compared to the price of Microsoft products [b]and get a couple of years support.
You don't "buy" an OS, you "buy" support for it. You can download MS OS freely, and MS even host free downloads now. You don't get a legal serial number, and without that you are in "demo mode" and get no updates or service packs. So these days, MS have caught up to the idea, and WGA authenticity is what you are really paying for. That is more important on Windows than on Linux, hence it comes free even if you download Linux for free. If you "buy" a Linux distribution, you get very good phone support from most of the distributors. Here in the U.K., because we get U.S. English Windows and have to switch the settings to U.K. (Metric and Spelling differences etc) we are expected to call a U.S. number for over the phone technical support. This *I* do not like. But the automatic updates are invaluable on Windows, so I will "buy", and will not use without WGA.
Theunis Jansen wrote:DOSBOX 0.74 runs the 16bit programs on Vista and Windows 7 and fiddling with the config file makes it viable for older programs only. U can even run a batch file to give u a menu and then run various programs from it. (It is like a VM for 16 bit progs)
DOSBox works exactly the same on Linux or BSD, by the way. ^_^
Theunis Jansen wrote:If you write your own programs for your company's use you may as well go LINUX.
If the choice of OS enterprise wide is within your power, I would agree. Sadly, it usually isn't. And Microsoft will hit the Purchasing department hard with advertisements, Debian, Mandrake and Red Hat are not likely to be so "pro-active".
Theunis Jansen wrote:I use Windows XP Pro SP2 and it suits my purposes. If this PC blows up I will consider LINUX as first choice because I'll buy a 64bit PC (actually just the Mboard, quad CPU and RAM). By the way the First National Bank (Just another name for BOB as their name used to be Barclays Overseas Bank incorporation the First National Bank of South Africa, has converted to LINUX so there must be something to it.
Last time I heard MS still couldn't make HotMail work on non-Linux servers. XD The server portion of the market is very much Unix (Linux, BSD, HPIX, Sun etc) dominated... it's Desktop computing that is ruled by MS, with encroachments on Publishing, Media, and Art and Design departments ruled by Apple
Theunis Jansen wrote:But all said and done if u upgrade your PC then VM (it's much cheaper than WINDOWS) is the way to go if you are rolling in cash because you have to have/buy every OS you want to run on it, (smart for developers) but then again u want to run what u have.
Hmm that was my farthings worth.
When your PC dies, having a P2V of it is very nice... you can boot your old PC inside your new one. Your old PC runs as it always did, on the OS it had (you already own that) and it doesn't really interfere with your new PC.

If you use an imaging system (like Norton Ghost, but there are many alternatives, and some are fee... not least the 'dd' command from GNU) you can create a new VM, restore the image onto it, and you are set. You have switched hardware, gained new technology and lost nothing.

Again, you "pay" for support. How vital your VM is to your every day life will determine if you wish to "buy" the OS you install on it. And how many of us already have copies of DOS, Windows 3.1, OS/2 lying around that we used to use... how often do you come across an Aldus PageMaker, GEM Draw, WordStar document in your archived records that you could really do with reading again? When this happens to me, I dig out a VM. I transferred my 5¼" Floppies and 3½" floppies of the installs for these OS and the software I ran on them to CD a long time ago... they are still legal, and I still have the right to run them... The VM is much nicer than having to unplug my hard drive and plug in something small and old I have lying around just to get to an old, old, old file.
Theunis Jansen
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Windows 7

Postby Theunis Jansen » Aug 11, 2010 20:25

Very Nice.
In our roundabout way I think we have answered the original question, by saying use Windows 7 but better still go VM.

Incidentally I say "Buy" just to show you must pay for what you get even if it's poor after sales support.

Mandriva's (latest cutting edge 64 bit) here in SA is about R500 (Rand
exchange rate rounded upward to R12 per British pound), while Microsoft WINDOWS 7 with far less choices is almost R2400 with poor local support.
(I think MS released C sharp to get some free programs and reading docs hidden away in far corners I found they say thank you to quite a few Universities for using *Nix and other open source code in their progs.)

Aah yes in the nineteen eighties the Cray computer was already using 40 CPUs. My point was more to the effect that Linux supports more CPU's than MS.
If I'm going too far don't get mad at me, just say SIS and I'll edit everything from 'Mandriva' onwards out of this post.
Last edited by Theunis Jansen on Aug 11, 2010 20:43, edited 1 time in total.
bobsobol
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Postby bobsobol » Aug 11, 2010 20:36

Here... I could have purchased Vista, Suse, Debian, Mandrake or Slackware for about the same price. PC-BSD cost less, but Mac OS X was less than half the price... for the OS, the PC required to run it was more than 3 times the price for a regular PC at half that performance. (half the memory, half the clock speed, half the CPU cores, half the hard drive, Read Only Optical etc. etc.)

I would pay a LOT more for the Mac OS, if I didn't have to use their hardware. Their support (I support and service Macs I don't own) is far beyond anything I have seen from Microsoft of Linux distributors.
CommanderRaven
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Postby CommanderRaven » Oct 09, 2010 3:41

My 2 cents on the whole Linix, Windows debate.

I have been working with computers since 1978. I had a TRS-80 Model 1 then. I have owned just about every major brand of computer since then.

Original IBM PC, Commodore Amiga 2500, 286, 386,486, Pentium, P2, P3, P4, .... To my present quad core PC.

I have seen Microsoft make terrible mistakes. MS DOS 4.0. Windows ME. Windows Vista. I have seen them make some great OS's too. 98, XP, and maybe Windows 7.

I ran Vista for almost 2 years, before I upgraded my PC to Windows 7. FYI, I did a upgrade, and had no problems at all using my exisiting Vista Hardware.

Since Windows 7 is really Vista with another couple of years of development, it's not surprising that I didn't have any issues.

I've worked as a IT admin/Support tech/Network admin for over 20 years.

But I also used to be Unix and AIX administrator for many years too.

I ran OS/2 desktops and servers, and Novell Netware.

Basically I have an extremely diverse background.

My problem with Linux isn't Linux. It's the typical uneducated, simple user.

Joe Smith goes to Walmart and buys a PC with Linux on it. He thinks wow I got a great deal. Ok then he buys a printer, and hooks it up to Linux, loads the drivers cd and ... nothing happens. Opps no drivers for Linux. Ok, if he's have a clue, then he goes the manufactures site, and looks there. If he's really good, he search to see if anyone has written a driver.

Joe discovers he's out of luck, talks the printer back to walmart and gets another printer. He then takes it home, but while at Walmart he saw a new game, and picked that up.

He fights with the printer and still no luck. He friend that SWORE to him the Linux was better than Windows, tries to help him. The load WINE on Linux to drive to get the game work. But the game requires Direct X 11, and guess what... No go.

Joe then takes it all back to Walmart and gets a PC with Windows.

Until the day Joe can walk in Walmart buy anything there and it works without trouble, Linux is doomed to fail.

That being said, each year Linux support does get better. But I know more unhappy users that tried Linux than unhappy Vista users. Granted I think the Vista users would out number them, but Vista got such a bad rap, that everyone avoided it.

By the time the latest Service Pack for Vista came out it was pretty a good OS then.

Too little too late though.

Now I know a lot of people buying Mac's, and having fun with them.

I'm not going to say Windows is better. I am going to say Windows 7 is just easier for a typical user that just doesn't have a clue.

Windows 7 is better than Vista, and I think it's better than XP for one reason and one reason only. Security. Windows 7 stole something from Linux. When you run Windows 7, even if you are a local Administrator, your programs don't run with Administrator rights unless you grant it.

This prevents some spyware, and other malicious software from getting on your system.

I spend a lot to time removing spyware from infected XP systems at homes. So far I haven't seen a single infected Windows 7 PC. So far...

And that right there sold me.

One guy mentioned Apple support being good. Sorry not my experience with them.

Before Steve Jobs came back, Apple allowed a company to produce Mac Clones. Steve Jobs killed it. Because they produced Macs that were faster, better and cheaper than Apple.

Apple killed their contract, and the company went out of business.

And the better faster Macs... Well it took Apple a couple of years to catch up.

Apple's arrogent attitude that they "are right" and everyone else is sh!t out luck.

I had a friend of mine that have over $3000 of I tunes music. His OS died, and he reinstalled his OS, and I tunes. The second he installed I-tunes, it went out, saw all of the unlicensed Music on his hard drive, and on his I Pod, and deleted it all.

He called Apple, and the Apple store, and you know what they told him. TOO F*CKING BAD! You should have call us before installed I-tunes. Now you have to spend the $3000 again.

Crock of sh!t.

Every time I have to reload a PC that has I Tunes on it, I tell them to call apple for help first. The few that ignore me, guess what, they lost all of their music.

Apple is such a control freak of a company. I won't give them a dime.

Granted Microsoft is getting there too. Now they have the power to deactivate my copy of Windows if they decide it's illegal. What a crock that is...

Bottomline, these companies are all about money, and support is gone.

The only company I think that good customer support is Dell and that's said. IBM is the worse. HP used to be good, not anymore.

I like Mac's, OS X is great. But I just don't like the company.

Anyway Rant over!
TESLACOIL
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and a worthy

Postby TESLACOIL » Mar 26, 2011 20:34

and a worthy rant it was too

im holding onto xp and praying windows 10 will be the ultra light ultra tight multi core multimedia ace

....my dreams , built about the bloat of vista , the partial return to sanity of windows 7 , the death of the desktop cos netbooks , tablets & phones are taking over that role taking over

enter a stripped down, mature and tight version of windows to run on these dinky machines


....i can dream cant I ?


XP forever , running on a 10ghz single core would be my heaven



somethings badly wrong if im walking out the shop & turning my nose up at a quadcore machine and buying a s/hand single core pc just in case my old faithful goes belly up....but that's just what Ive done....i know what i want, & i now Ive got it , peace of mind for the next 5 or maybe 10 years. and all for the price of 2 crates of beer
mrwhy
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Youngatser on the way up!

Postby mrwhy » Jul 08, 2011 15:54

phishguy wrote:My son got a new PC with Vista that had an offer for a free upgrade to Windows 7. He likes the 7 version much better than Vista. He did run into some games that wouldn't work. However, on his own, and without any help, he installed XP as a virtual OS. He was then able to play the games. I thought that it was pretty amazing that my 12 year old son was able to do that on his own. He's going to know more than me pretty soon.

My computer is still running XP because it an old piece of $%#@.


Yes I have a Grandson, Harvey, who will be 11 years old next week.
I feel the same!
mrwhy
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Re: and a worthy

Postby mrwhy » Jul 08, 2011 15:56

TESLACOIL wrote:and a worthy rant it was too

im holding onto xp and praying windows 10 will be the ultra light ultra tight multi core multimedia ace

....my dreams , built about the bloat of vista , the partial return to sanity of windows 7 , the death of the desktop cos netbooks , tablets & phones are taking over that role taking over

enter a stripped down, mature and tight version of windows to run on these dinky machines


....i can dream cant I ?


XP forever , running on a 10ghz single core would be my heaven



somethings badly wrong if im walking out the shop & turning my nose up at a quadcore machine and buying a s/hand single core pc just in case my old faithful goes belly up....but that's just what Ive done....i know what i want, & i now Ive got it , peace of mind for the next 5 or maybe 10 years. and all for the price of 2 crates of beer


Completely agree
XP is the least bad M$ ever did!
cha0s
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Postby cha0s » Jul 08, 2011 23:11

Windows 8 running HTML5/JS? :P What you wanted tight? hmmm. v8 is pretty tight! GOOGLE/MS for president 2012!
1000101
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Postby 1000101 » Jul 19, 2011 10:42

Having followed this thread over the last year I have come to the conclusion that the arguement is over which type of nail is the best instead of focusing on the real issue of - do I need a hammer or a screw driver? All all* of you have done is expressed opinion about this and that without supporting facts.


Personally I use Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit on my main desktop (newest hardware) and Windows XP (with all updates and patches) on the rest of my network (server, daughters computer, my laptop). This is simply because my new hardware is designed for screw drivers and my old hardware is designed for hammers. The best performance you will ever get from your hardware is buy running software which is properly matched for it.


As to trivial concerns over bloat, they are all bloated. Unless you spend months learning about the intricacies of your software, you will never avoid bloat. Be it knowing how to administer your system software or knowing which files are actually safe to remove are so far beyond the ken of the average user (and 99%** of advanced users) that all modern systems have an certain level of bloat, this is not limited to any one vendor. Microsoft being the favourite to pick on is just that, the favoured enemy.


Anyway, saying things like, "98SE4LIF," "I <3 Apple," and other such nonsense is just an indicator of blatant sagacity. A brand is a brand. You have to pick the tool for the job. That MasterCraft makes a nice solid 2lb hammer is quite irrelevant when you need a screw driver. Locking your mindset around MS vs Apple, Apple vs BSD, BSD vs Unix, etc is a losing strategy as they are just a wrapper for the real meat inside - the software tools you need based on the job which needs to be done.


Don't pick you tools based on fanboyism. Pick your tools based on appropriateness for the job.


* "All" is a general statement and all* general statements are false.
** Number made up for illustration purposes, not to be taken as fact.
Mihail_B
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Re: Youngatser on the way up!

Postby Mihail_B » Sep 12, 2011 14:31

firebone wrote:
phishguy wrote:My son got a new PC with Vista that had an offer for a free upgrade to Windows 7. He likes the 7 version much better than Vista. He did run into some games that wouldn't work. However, on his own, and without any help, he installed XP as a virtual OS. He was then able to play the games. I thought that it was pretty amazing that my 12 year old son was able to do that on his own. He's going to know more than me pretty soon.

My computer is still running XP because it an old piece of $%#@.


Just the same. I respect 7 version, but me pc runs xp. I just afraid to install vista or 7 just because the system is too old to work on it.


I don't have a son but ... Win7 is really a bestof for me !
I was inlove of win98se ... i had to use winxp for a while ... I thought winxp will work slower but no ! It incredib. worked faster and with less bugs ... (installed on a FAT32 partition- P3-450-160MBRam)
I had to upgrade my pc since this P3 was consuming 125WPerH ...with
a netbook ... havin win7starter ...
I will never change starter for ultimate ... it's to damn fast ! It never gave me any critical error not even one ! ...

but it lacks for the advanced tools that linux has ... (I mean in the way of configuration ... ; but again win7 is very stable ...)
I don't have any Real-time anti-virus ... but I do not seem to have any problem
(that's one of the reasons my pc goes real fast ... :| )

All the versions of windows/linux/dos are nice ... ;)
marcov
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Postby marcov » Sep 13, 2011 7:20

Same here XP, Vista/32,Vista64 and win7/32 on various work and home machines.

Specially on laptops, changing OS is often nothing but trouble.
albert
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Windows 7

Postby albert » Oct 26, 2011 17:51

I bought Windows 7.

Which comes in the box with both a 32 Bit and 64 Bit installation disk.

I installed the 64 bit

It needed to download several hundred megabytes of updates.

So you need an ethernet connection or you will be waiting hours for the updates to download by WI-FI.

Its downloaded about 2.5 GigaBytes of updates since I installed it; that includes newer drivers for the hardware from the hardware companies and all the MS-live and Adobe stuff.

The NVidia drivers were 200 MegaBytes for the graphics/ethernet/sound hardware..

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